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Thread: Recommended Host For WP based site?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PayForWords View Post
    I ran that tool and it said my total plugin impact time wise was 3.9%. Also, the problem was here before I had any plugins at all.
    I've been able to get it down some by enabling caching but it has never been this slow for me before. I wonder if upgrading will help?
    I'm on their lowest hosting plan currently.
    If you can't get decent load times on a normal site ( not hosting a crap load of audio or video files), with no special functions and relatively low traffic, then it's time to move.
    Why even sell the lower plan if it's not good enough for the most basic of websites?

    Go Daddy's problem is that they cram FAR too many sites on each server, and they attract total amateurs that don't know what they are installing, and have unsecure sites. One person can screw up the entire server. Now multiply that by how people are on the server....which could be any number as far as we know. It could be 100. It could be 1000.

    Combine that with the fact that the very cheapest plans attract the very cheapest webmasters. The "trying to make adsense money from blogging" types who will try every shortcut, script, and plug in that promises instant riches. Plain and simple, too many fly by night amateur webmasters use Go Daddy to trust any shared hosting from them.

    I used to recommend Go Daddy until about 2 1/2 years ago. Go Daddy had a 3 day crapfest where a lot of sites were down, and of the ones that were up, they were barely loading. I was on it for all 3 days for clients and just happened to grab about 6 client sites at random (who all signed up months apart) to see what IP addresses they were on. 5 of them were on the same IP which I confirmed with Go Daddy tech support. Either that was one hell of a coincidence, or they cram too many sites together.

    I moved to a dedicated server with my host a few years ago and never looked back. I don't have to worry about anyone else screwing with my site's load times, crashing the server, spamming from a shared IP address, and all of the other crap that comes with it. I know my sites are on their own server, have their own IP address and I can run anything I want. For me, it's worth the money.

    Do I suggest it for everyone? Not really. Not if you only have 1 or 2, low-med traffic sites. You should be able to find something reliable for a decent rate. I send most of my clients to BlueHost and (with the exception of that freak outage last Friday) have had nothing but good service from them.


    As far as upgrading goes...VPS isn't much better to me. It feels like the illusion of control, but it's still shared hosting. If you are going to go VPS, just kick in the extra $20 a month and go dedicated server.

    That's just my opinion, which is not neccessarily based on any significant IT knowledge or server side administration. Just my personal preference.
    Last edited by Harold Mansfield; 08-10-2013 at 01:38 AM.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    If you can't get decent load times on a normal site ( not hosting a crap load of audio or video files), with no special functions and relatively low traffic, then it's time to move.
    Why even sell the lower plan if it's not good enough for the most basic of websites?

    Go Daddy's problem is that they cram FAR too many sites on each server, and they attract total amateurs that don't know what they are installing, and have unsecure sites. One person can screw up the entire server. Now multiply that by how people are on the server....which could be any number as far as we know. It could be 100. It could be 1000.

    Combine that with the fact that the very cheapest plans attract the very cheapest webmasters. The "trying to make adsense money from blogging" types who will try every shortcut, script, and plug in that promises instant riches. Plain and simple, too many fly by night amateur webmasters use Go Daddy to trust any shared hosting from them.

    I used to recommend Go Daddy until about 2 1/2 years ago. Go Daddy had a 3 day crapfest where a lot of sites were down, and of the ones that were up, they were barely loading. I was on it for all 3 days for clients and just happened to grab about 6 client sites at random (who all signed up months apart) to see what IP addresses they were on. 5 of them were on the same IP which I confirmed with Go Daddy tech support. Either that was one hell of a coincidence, or they cram too many sites together.

    I moved to a dedicated server with my host a few years ago and never looked back. I don't have to worry about anyone else screwing with my site's load times, crashing the server, spamming from a shared IP address, and all of the other crap that comes with it. I know my sites are on their own server, have their own IP address and I can run anything I want. For me, it's worth the money.

    Do I suggest it for everyone? Not really. Not if you only have 1 or 2, low-med traffic sites. You should be able to find something reliable for a decent rate. I send most of my clients to BlueHost and (with the exception of that freak outage last Friday) have had nothing but good service from them.


    As far as upgrading goes...VPS isn't much better to me. It feels like the illusion of control, but it's still shared hosting. If you are going to go VPS, just kick in the extra $20 a month and go dedicated server.

    That's just my opinion, which is not neccessarily based on any significant IT knowledge or server side administration. Just my personal preference.

    I've heard of people saying similar things. One guy even told me there were over 4,000 other sites on his shared server.


    This is the first trouble I've had with GoDaddy and the only reason I started using them in the first place was because...


    They give me 50% off all my orders. Might be time to go back to Host Gator for me (or try a different provider).


    We'll see what happens though. Thanks for the feedback!

  3. #13
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    Of course you already know My IT Guy is here on the forum and he does hosting, and actually owns the equipment. I always tell people to host with a company that owns the equipment, not a 3rd party reseller.

    WPMU did a pretty good set of hosting review articles recently which compares Page.ly, Bluehost, Go Daddy, Dreamhost, and WP Engine. They've done a good job with the articles, I just don't agree with all of their assessments based on my own experiences.

    Here's the article, which links to each individual review:
    Web Hosting Review: So Just Who is the Best? - WPMU.org

  4. #14

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    Harold, we know Jeff through the forum an this thread has me thinking about switching to him. I have no problems with my current shared server though.

    But in the absence of knowing someone through a forum such as this over a long period of time and developing a trust, how would you find a host that is financially sound and owns their own servers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    Harold, we know Jeff through the forum an this thread has me thinking about switching to him. I have no problems with my current shared server though.

    But in the absence of knowing someone through a forum such as this over a long period of time and developing a trust, how would you find a host that is financially sound and owns their own servers?
    It's tough. I only know of hosts from having to work with so many different ones. There are a LOT of 3rd party resellers out there who all basically rent space from Go Daddy, Hostgator, and the others who have affiliate programs. I can pick a Go Daddy reseller out easily because they all look the same.


    I only know a few stand alone companies outside of that Bluehost/Hostgator/Just Host/WP Engine mashup:

    WebAir (the host I use)
    Network Solutions
    Amazon
    iPage ( who I've had problems with in the past and I'm not completely sure they are independent)
    1&1 ( not a fan)
    AT&T
    Century Link
    Cox
    Earthlink
    Rackspace
    (Time/Warner probably has business hosting now too)
    Pretty much everyone in the Cable/ISP game is now doing some kind of business hosting bundle thing, so anyone who's not sure can at least start there.

    And there are a few Enterprise Solutions out there that the average website owner doesn't need.

    WordPress actually does Enterprise Level stuff for companies like Time, TED, UPS, Dow Jones and so on. I think it starts at $15k a month. Most people don't need that.

    For consumer, Small Business Level stuff, I just know the few that I mentioned.

    And then there are companies like Google that do app hosting
    Last edited by Harold Mansfield; 08-10-2013 at 07:03 PM.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    As far as upgrading goes...VPS isn't much better to me. It feels like the illusion of control, but it's still shared hosting. If you are going to go VPS, just kick in the extra $20 a month and go dedicated server.

    That's just my opinion, which is not neccessarily based on any significant IT knowledge or server side administration. Just my personal preference.
    That depends on the virtualization that is used and also whether or not they "burst". If someone says that they burst CPU or RAM, run. Run far, far away.

    For example, at Rackspace each Cloud Server is running on a Xen hypervisor with 32GB RAM. Allocating 2GB for OpenStack, that leaves a maximum of 60 virtualized servers per physical host. On a 512MB cloud server, you also get 1vCPU, which is approximately 1/8 of a physical CPU based on my calculations. Plus each server has it's own dedicated IP address, or you can provision it without a public interface if you don't want it accessible over the Internet.

    The only thing that can't reliably be virtualized is disk I/O. But if you're running a properly configured server stack, you really don't care about disk I/O because requests from the outside should rarely hit the disk.

    If disk I/O is really an issue, I can "buyout" an entire node with a 30GB cloud server for significantly less than what I'm going to pay to lease the same dedicated server. (Yes, I have considered my own hardware and leasing a rack in a datacenter. Basically, once maintenance, MFRs, and personnel costs are also factored in, I'm better off using Amazon or Rackspace or HP until I'm spending low seven figures in hosting costs.)

    And actually, in nearly all categories, the 30GB (full node) and 15GB (half node) are the best bang-for-the-buck, followed closely by the 512MB. The 1GB-8GB don't really make sense on a commodity level. They have their place, but if scaling for a website or app it's better to scale horizontally to ~86 512MB nodes than it is to run two 30GB nodes in my opinion (assuming you're wanting to have at least two nodes so that you if one dies you're still alive - also this is considering only raw cost and not network overhead cost if these web/app servers need to actually communicate with each other).

    A while back, I started running into the I/O issue with databases on a cluster of 3 1GB cloud servers. I decided to check into running a dedicated cluster. The "big" option available at the time was an 8GB dedicated server. For a comparable cloud setup (8GB cloud servers - when running DB clusters you base your limits on how many sites you can fit into RAM on average), the cost of the dedicated setup was 350% the cost of the cloud setup. While I lost a little disk I/O available overhead with the cloud servers, I lost immense flexibility with the dedicated servers. Dedicated server dies, and you're SOL until another one can be provisioned, and depending on backlog that could easily be several hours. Cloud server dies, and you just hit the API and spin up another one. If you're doing it the right way, your configuration is under management by Puppet (my preference), Chef, Ansible, or some other config management tool, and none of your data's primary home is a single system. For a 512MB server running as a web or app server, I'm back online in under 6 minutes. 8GB database server is maybe 9 minutes from provisioning request to the point where it joins the cluster, and, depending on time of day and how many calls are actually going to the database, about an hour before it's ready to receive requests again.

    How do I know the cloud servers in each cluster are on separate physical nodes? Their metadata gives me a UUID of the host node. Their API does attempt to provision randomly, but I did land two servers on the same node once. But that was pretty easy to check and fix. If I was in a hurry, I could have requested the provisioning of several servers at once and, as soon as they were active, take the first three or so that had different host node UUIDs and destroy the rest.
    Last edited by Brian Altenhofel; 08-10-2013 at 11:30 PM.
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    Now see, I only understand about 10% of that. I base all of my knowledge on the issue on my experience climbing the ladder from shared hosting, to dedicated server...and troubleshooting other people's sites who've had too much or not enough hosting based on their actual needs.

    There's just no way I'm ever going to understand all of that. If I had to know that in order to choose the proper VPS plan, then I'm more apt to just go "screw it, just give me a dedicated server plan" which is what I did.

    I also do a lot of testing, and usually have at least 5-10 personal sites in various states that I'm always tinkering with. So I felt it was the right move for me.

    But there is no way that I have the time or the inclination to learn enough to understand all of that. I don't know how anyone who is not in the business of hosting does.

    Anytime I have a cleint with special needs, I just call my host and ask them what's the best way to go. They haven't steered me wrong yet.
    Last edited by Harold Mansfield; 08-10-2013 at 11:45 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PayForWords View Post
    I wonder if upgrading will help?
    Upgrading with your current host? Nope - all they will do is allocate you more space, or increase limits on certain features.

    Quote Originally Posted by PayForWords View Post
    I've heard of people saying similar things. One guy even told me there were over 4,000 other sites on his shared server.
    The server you are on has 2,657 domains associated to the same IP as yours.
    Reverse IP Lookup - ViewDNS.info

    This only tells a small portion of the story, as a single server can have dozens of IP Addresses assigned to it, each associated with thousands of domains.

    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    But in the absence of knowing someone through a forum such as this over a long period of time and developing a trust, how would you find a host that is financially sound and owns their own servers?
    In all honesty, its really difficult to tell as there are many different ways to get into the hosting industry, with/without your own IP Blocks and with/without your own servers. Sometimes you may just have to ask the host basic information (What datacenter, sample IP's and etc) and use this information to perform a basic investigation (Check arin.net to see who really owns/uses the assigned IP's, does this match up with their location and/or DC name they provided?)

    Even then, this will not tell you if they actually own the equipment, or if they rent/lease it from someone else who may terminate them at any time due to other clients abuse or etc...

    If you have any hosts your interested in, let me know and I'll do some research when time permits.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyITGuy View Post
    The server you are on has 2,657 domains associated to the same IP as yours.
    Reverse IP Lookup - ViewDNS.info

    This only tells a small portion of the story, as a single server can have dozens of IP Addresses assigned to it, each associated with thousands of domains.
    My Word! On one IP address? Surely those aren't all active websites, or is there any way to tell?

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MyITGuy View Post
    Upgrading with your current host? Nope - all they will do is allocate you more space, or increase limits on certain features.


    The server you are on has 2,657 domains associated to the same IP as yours.
    Reverse IP Lookup - ViewDNS.info

    This only tells a small portion of the story, as a single server can have dozens of IP Addresses assigned to it, each associated with thousands of domains.



    In all honesty, its really difficult to tell as there are many different ways to get into the hosting industry, with/without your own IP Blocks and with/without your own servers. Sometimes you may just have to ask the host basic information (What datacenter, sample IP's and etc) and use this information to perform a basic investigation (Check arin.net to see who really owns/uses the assigned IP's, does this match up with their location and/or DC name they provided?)

    Even then, this will not tell you if they actually own the equipment, or if they rent/lease it from someone else who may terminate them at any time due to other clients abuse or etc...

    If you have any hosts your interested in, let me know and I'll do some research when time permits.

    I appreciate the info but that isn't the domain in question. That page actually loads as quickly as it should (2 or 3 seconds usually).


    I would be THRILLED if the domain in question would load that quickly. It's The Blog Age - Not The Ice Age


    I've been thinking about trying Host Gator's Level 1 VPS. Would that be sufficient for a blog? Updated 4-5X a week?

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