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Thread: Most annoying grammatical error

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    I'm not sure I agree that it shouldn't matter. I think being able to express yourself should include being able to spell and write grammatically. I'm not saying an occasional typo or something is inexcusable, but I've seen posts on some forums that are practically illiterate, and these are people who are claiming they want to own garment decoration businesses. Like it or not, things like this, and whether you speak grammatically as well, can have an impact on how people perceive you.

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    Get used to it folks. My kids are barely taught spelling in school. My oldest is thirteen and I don't think he has been taught much punctuation let alone grammar. They no longer teach cursive writing either. My employee graduated high school two years ago and got a full academic scholership to college, but couldn't read the graduation card I gave him.
    Steve B

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by KristineS View Post
    ... Like it or not, things like this, and whether you speak grammatically as well, can have an impact on how people perceive you.
    Absolutely. I have noticed many times in Court (in the UK) that Defendants who speak good English are more likely to be found Not Guilty, or to be let off with a lenient sentence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
    Get used to it folks. My kids are barely taught spelling in school. My oldest is thirteen and I don't think he has been taught much punctuation let alone grammar. They no longer teach cursive writing either. My employee graduated high school two years ago and got a full academic scholership to college, but couldn't read the graduation card I gave him.
    I don't know that this is a get used to it situation. I agree that grammar rules and forms of language change over time. We don't, for instance, write long flowery sentences like they did back in the 1500's. Still, I think everyone, should, at minimum, be able to speak grammatically and write grammatically, and certainly be able to read. If your employee graduated and got an academic scholarship and can't read a greeting card, then something is seriously wrong with the education he received.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
    Get used to it folks. My kids are barely taught spelling in school. My oldest is thirteen and I don't think he has been taught much punctuation let alone grammar. They no longer teach cursive writing either. My employee graduated high school two years ago and got a full academic scholership to college, but couldn't read the graduation card I gave him.
    Since there are no national standards, I think this is more a regional/local phenomenon. My kids (1st and 3rd grade) attend a public school in PA and have spelling words every week. In addition, they both have penmanship workbooks they use multiple times a week. My 3rd grader started learning cursive in January. Both of them also do journaling multiple times per week. They start with a "sloppy copy". Then the teacher reviews it with them and corrects for grammar and punctuation. After the review, they re-write it in their official journal with the corrections. The teacher coordinate their teaching material and techniques within the district, so each of the elementary schools are doing this in the same manner for each grade.

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    The lack of cursive education has been covered on the national news several times recently. You might just be lucky that they are teaching it in your area. Kristine - he couldn't read the greating card because it was in cursive. He got a full academic scholarship to a Division 1 school.
    Steve B

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    I do know that many schools have stopped teaching cursive. I'm not as surprised by that. I learned to type on an electric typewriter and they don't teach that anymore either.

    And SteveB, the not being able to read the card thing makes more sense now. Reading cursive is an acquired skill, I suppose.

  8. #18

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    I don't really get annoyed, because I typo all the time. I know mistakes are easy to make, especially when someone is going fast.

    When I make a mistake, I am annoyed by too for to (or two).

    Also, one that I see people do is: loosing instead of losing. I think it's because losing sounds like loo- people type it incorrectly.

    I think it's just that people are typing it like it sounds, and aren't really paying attention.

  9. #19

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    I catch myself interchanging their and there frequently. I know better. I bet there is some sort of medical reason for it.

    We mentioned all caps earlier in this thread. Most people don't like people on forums because it seems like people are shouting at you. I think its ok to emphasize an important word at times though.

    Interestingly, I get all cap emails at times. They are usually spam or RFQ's from frequent scam countries like Nigeria. It sends up a big flag that this might be a fraudulent order.

    Also, I don't always use paragraphs correctly. I frequently use them to separate text for readability on the web.

    I'm also much more careful in business emails than I am here. Here I might use lower case for names for example. That's just being lazy. I'm more concerned about having a clear, readable post than something that is absolutely grammatically correct here. And I even see the professional writers use words like "gonna" every once in a while, but that doesn't affect my perception of them as a professional writer if its used properly.

    The one thing that I don't think has been mentioned is text speak like "u" for "you". That really bugs me. I understand why people use it on phones as the keyboards are such a pain to use, but I certainly don't like it on forum posts.

    A question: What do people use in email subjects? Personally I use proper case.

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    In e-mail subject lines I tend to use proper case as well. It just looks odd to me otherwise.

    A pet peeve of mine is also people who capitalize words in the middle of a sentence or at random. Drives me nuts, which is another reason I don't do it in e-mail headlines.

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