Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 59

Thread: Do Offensive Ads Turn You Away?

  1. #21
    Registered User
    Array
    huggytree's Avatar

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Mukwonago, WI
    Posts
    3,053

    Default

    you create your own customers...go daddy is getting the customers it wants..

    if you offend 25%, but attract 75% isnt that a smart thing to do?

    as a businessman i work for anyone with money...doesnt matter who their are or what they believe. but as a consumer i dont buy products which i dont support...

    an example-i dont buy anything from Heinz...from catchup to Orida french fries.. i dont like her politics and dont want my money going to them...nor do i buy Dixie chicks cd's anymore.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Array
    Spider's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    3,687

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    Technical stuff is the only reason I might buy from them, no matter how little I might know about technical things
    Again that's you. You're not everyone. Just because a company is technical doesn't mean it's the only way they can or should market themselves.
    That's not just me, though. Unless Godaddy is selling other products that are not technical in nature. (In which case, I withdraw.)

    If a company's product line is solely apples, then apples is the only reason people will buy from them. That's all I'm saying. Now if you can sell more apples by depicting Jed Clampett discovering oil in his backyard, or a sexy-looking female motorcycle cop make suggestive homosexual comments to another good-looking female driver, or by having a bikini-clad beauty hold up a jar of pickles, then I would be surprised. And it doesn't make a bit of difference what personality type one is - it depends on the public wanting to buy apples.


    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    ...Prior to their first Super Bowl commercial not many people knew who they were. Now they're probably the first company that comes to mind for most people when thinking about domains.
    Surely that is because they are the only domain registrar and hosting company that advertises to such an extent. They could have used the silly Jed Clampett example I quoted and gained as much recognition. I believe the Super Bowl example says more about Super Bowl advertising than it says about sex in advertising.

  3. #23
    Moderator
    Array
    Dan Furman's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kingston, NY
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider View Post
    Bit late with the news, there, Dan. Geico has been selling to the general public more or less since inception, and in a more targetted fashion since probably the 1950s or before. Warren Buffet was investing in the company by the 1970s and took them over in the 1990s, if memory services me correctly. I believe they have only been advertising in the current mode for the past ten years.

    Judging by comments from the company, the gecko ads are more profitable than other current ads, and despite the massive increase in advertising expenditure overall during the past decade, GEICO is still only the sixth largest auto insurer, I think. As far as I can tell, they have been a household name for the past 40 years.
    that last part is very, very unlikely. Which was my point.

    There's likely no way to "prove" this, but I'm very comfortable saying that ten years ago, it's very unlikely the average person knew who Geico was.
    Last edited by Dan Furman; 02-18-2010 at 10:30 PM.
    Dan Furman - Copywriter, Business Author, Entrepreneurial/Business Consultant
    Business Writing Services | Website Copywriting Services | Blog here

  4. #24

    Default

    Look at it differently Spider. Geico does their ads implying value and service. Allstate, who had a reputation in the past of cancel the insuree if they had an accident counters with a direct attack on Geico prices.

    Geico could have responded by a direct attack on Allstate. They didn't do that. They continue to say their insurance is a bargan and they provide great customer service. Having used Geico for years and having had several accidents in that time frame, they live up to that claim.

    When I see the ads for Allstate saying switch from Geico and save X% guarenteed, I see a slimebag pitchman selling lies. Who's goiing to save? The 80 y/o with a car but doesn't drive? I trust Geico in part because they take the high road. When a company such as Allstate makes a frontal attack, I say "something stinks here".

  5. #25
    Moderator
    Array
    Dan Furman's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kingston, NY
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    Again that's you. You're not everyone.
    Yup. This is the biggest mistake people make in discussing / advising on advertising.
    Dan Furman - Copywriter, Business Author, Entrepreneurial/Business Consultant
    Business Writing Services | Website Copywriting Services | Blog here

  6. #26
    Moderator
    Array
    Dan Furman's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kingston, NY
    Posts
    1,258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by huggytree View Post
    nor do i buy Dixie chicks cd's anymore.
    anymore???
    Dan Furman - Copywriter, Business Author, Entrepreneurial/Business Consultant
    Business Writing Services | Website Copywriting Services | Blog here

  7. #27
    Post Impressionist
    Array
    vangogh's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    Posts
    15,061
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by huggytree
    if you offend 25%, but attract 75% isnt that a smart thing to do?
    That's exactly what I'm trying to say.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider
    That's not just me, though
    I don't literally mean only you, but you as in a segment of the market. See huggy's comment above.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider
    If a company's product line is solely apples, then apples is the only reason people will buy from them.
    Actually people buy because of how apples make them feel. If you have a commodity product then people probably just buy the first one they see on the shelf. Maybe that is true of apples, but for most products people buy based on an emotional response they gain from the product.

    People look at things like features and specs in order to justify to themselves what's ultimately an emotional choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by Spider
    Surely that is because they are the only domain registrar and hosting company that advertises to such an extent. They could have used the silly Jed Clampett example I quoted and gained as much recognition. I believe the Super Bowl example says more about Super Bowl advertising than it says about sex in advertising.
    Not every company that has advertised during the Super Bowl has done well with their commercial. The Super Bowl only guarantees a large reach. It doesn't necessarily mean your commercial automatically connects with people.

    That commercial is absolutely using sex to sell. I'd say it's using sex to get attention. Most of the commercial is simply trying to gain attention so you watch. They want you to remember the brand and connect it to the marketing message. I've seen some where the marketing message is little more than a quick line and others where throughout the commercial there's a connection to purchasing a domain.

    Most people are clueless if you ask them to name a domain registrar. It's not anything most people should know. Yet people want websites and in order to get one they usually need to purchase a domain. If all GoDaddy accomplishes with their commercials is to get people to connect the name GoDaddy with the concept of registering a domain then those commercials have been successful.

    A Jed Clampett ad probably wasn't getting the same attention as Danica Patrick and girls removing clothing, except maybe with fans of the Beverly Hillbillies and even then maybe not.

    Does it mean that they couldn't come up with a better commercial? I'm sure they could, but that's the way they went at first. It seems to have worked for them and it's now part of their image. You may not care for that image. Other people seem to like it or at least not be turned off by it. It doesn't do anything for me one way or the other.
    l Join me as I share my creative process and journey as a writer | StevenBradley.me
    l Design, Development, Marketing, and SEO Tutorials | Steven Bradley's Notebook
    l Get my book about Design Fundamentals

  8. #28
    Registered User
    Array
    Spider's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    3,687

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    ...Not every company that has advertised during the Super Bowl has done well with their commercial. The Super Bowl only guarantees a large reach. It doesn't necessarily mean your commercial automatically connects with people...
    And do we know that Godaddy's ad "connected with people?" I see no evidence of it and have seen no business reference to increased sales, greater brand recognition, or any other metric.


    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    ...Other people seem to like it or at least not be turned off by it. It doesn't do anything for me one way or the other.
    I'm not for or against it, either. I just think it is not as successful an ad campaign as you guys seem to think, for the reasons stated.

  9. #29
    Registered User
    Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Jackson MO
    Posts
    1,515

    Default

    I think this thread itself is proof that the ad worked. The ad purpose was to increase brand awareness.

    Most advertising does not work on the rational side of the brain. Instead, it work on the subconscious mind. The general public will forget about the ad in a few months, but still remember the name. That will give GoDaddy an advantage over other companies that do not have any name recognition.
    HouseView™ - The leading real estate site for South East Missouri. Follow us on Twitter @HVOL.
    Jackson MO Real Estate, Cape Girardeau Missouri Real Estate, Festus Missouri Real Estate

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Array
    Spider's Avatar

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    3,687

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Furman View Post
    As far as I can tell, they have been a household name for the past 40 years.
    that last part is very, very unlikely. Which was my point.
    There's likely no way to "prove" this, but I'm very comfortable saying that ten years ago, it's very unlikely the average person knew who Geico was.
    I have no statistics to prove it one way or the other, so you may be quite right, Dan. However, let's apply a little logic.

    If GEICO initially focussed on government employees and broadened their reach from that demographic, in the 70 years of their existence, a tremendous number of people fit into the group "government emplyees." Not only do we have federal employees, but all state government employees, from dog-catcher to governor; local and state police; school, college and university teachers, professors and staff, along with other quasi-government entities and their staff, like the postal service. Plus the military - and on this score we have, during the time in question, one world war, Korea, Vietnam, and European, Japanese and a few other overseas bases. An awful lot of people rotated through those categories in these 70 years. All would have been confronted many times by an insurance offer from GEICO.

    I venture to suggest that even if you forget entirely GEICO's reach to the population at large, there was hardly a household in the country 10 years ago that had not heard of GEICO.

    Now, it is entirely possible that GEICO did not reach or come to the attention of every "government employee" and it's possible many of those "government employees" did not need insurance, but I think logic tells us that quite a few of them were familiar with that name.

    Also, as the sixth largest auto insurance company and considering the extent of car ownership in the US, this second line of logic seems to support that familarity, too.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •