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Thread: What information would you like to receive along with a quotation?

  1. #1

    Default What information would you like to receive along with a quotation?

    Hello everyone,

    Not sure if I'm writing to the right place, but still, want to hear your ideas on something.

    I have a small web design company. In order to improve the price quote I send to my customer, I would like to include some useful information with it.

    My question is what information would you like to receive a price? Something that can "push" you to order the service if the price is right?

    The workflow process? Another customer review? Some kind of guarantee? Maybe some statistic how website increasing the trust of potential customers?

    All your feedback is much appreciated.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the forum Viva. I worked as a freelance web designer for more than a decade and I found when quoting a price the best thing to send potential clients/customers is the price you're going to charge and what work you'll do for that price. Your clients/customers don't care about your process. Guarantees and customer reviews might have helped convince them to contact you, but neither is going to help with a price quote. The statistics about increasing trust are also meaningless in a price quote.

    After someone has contacted you asking for a price, you're past the point where you need to sell them on the idea of having a website or the point where you need to sell yourself. What people want in a price quote is the price and what work is covered for that price.

    Are you asking because you've been having trouble getting clients/customers to say yes after you send them a quote? If that's the case, we can probably help you figure out why, but I don't think the answer is in adding more to the price quote. You can add some of the things you mentioned to your site. You can place a guarantee in a contract. I wouldn't add any of that to a price quote though.
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    A well compiled portfolio is probably going to be one of your strongest assets in the web design space. When it comes to any internet, or service based industry, everyone is always going to try and undercut you. The best thing you can do is immediately, with your quote, provide a proven track record of excellence. This is what will separate your quote from your competition, you need to prove the value of your service before the customer even has an opportunity to consider a lower offer.

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    I agree with both previous responses. As Vangogh said nobody cares about anything other than the actual "value" and price. As Razagas said it is your previous work that may be the determining factor. Show your best work. That is what I would consider before hiring any type of contractor.

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    I agree with the above. By the time you're at the quote, all those other things would probably have been seen, read or discussed. Having a clear set of deliverables, and a timeline to completion. For me that is most important. Leave no variables, or misunderstandings about what is expected of them, or what is included.

    Projects have a way of getting out of hand when the client is allowed to make assumptions about what is included. You also have to stay on top of people and be clear about what their responsibilities are to keep the project on track and on schedule.

    If you're submitting bids without having the benefit of speaking to the potential client, this is a little more difficult. In that case you need to make sure that all questions are answered on your website. A lot of web designers spend more time talking about design than they do talking about the business and the process. What people can expect of them, and what's included for their money. If your website is doing it's job by the time the phone rings you should be closing...not still selling. This makes the quote process much easier and the close much quicker.

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    I concur with both past reactions. As Vangogh said no one considerations in regards to something besides the real "esteem" and cost. As Razagas said it is your past work that might be the deciding element

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    First, the reviews from the past clients is really important to have good impressions for your service because this will tell your prospects that your service is proven and improving.

  8. #8

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    The best thing you can do is instantly, with your statement, give a demonstrated reputation of greatness. This is the thing that will isolate your statement from your opposition, you have to demonstrate the estimation of your administration before the client even has a chance to consider a lower offer.

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