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Thread: Employee Reviews: Helpful or Harmful

  1. #31

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    I do think reviews can be a good thing. When positive attitudes and constructive criticism is used that is. As the boss I would go into the situation with a well-written list of what your employee has done with corrective actions and praises attached. You should always be prepared, if you seem unorganized they will most likely not take you seriously (and from experience, especially if you are younger than them). It is likely that the employee may not take the help with open arms. This is where keeping a positive attitude helps. Also, once you come up with an action plan and the employee agrees to it, hold yourself and especially them accountable. At the next review make sure to address what has and has not changed from the last one and where to go from there.

  2. #32
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    Is there any reason that has to wait for a once or twice a year review? As an employee by the time a review rolled around I knew what kind of job I was doing. Reviews never added much for me. I'd rather my employer talk to me more often. When I do something well tell me. When I could use some improvement in a certain area tell me and tell me how I can do better.

    I think the better approach is to consistently let your employees know how they're doing throughout the year instead of waiting every 6 months or a year to tell them.
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    I'd agree with that Vangogh. I always try to give the people who work with and for me immediate feedback. If they do well, I tell them so. If they do something that needs work, I tell them that too. Waiting until once a year means discussing things that happened months ago. By that time, most of the positive reinforcement is gone.

  4. #34
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    Most experts on the subject say that reinforcement, either positive or negative, is more effective when it's given closer in time to the actions being reinforced. The longer you wait the less of a connection is seen between the review and what's being reviewed.

    I'm sure there are companies that do a better job offering reviews than others. I didn't work for any of them, but I'm sure they exist. Still I think the better approach is letting your employees know how they're doing more often instead of waiting. I also think reviews would work better if they weren't so closely tied to raises. I think they become less about the review in that case and more about the raise.
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  5. #35

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    Frequent feedback and periodic reviews are not mutually exclusive. In fact, both are essential to good employee growth. In an organization where a single boss closely guides his employees, frequent feedback may be enough. Where input comes from multiple people, trying to prioritize the feedback, and even perhaps sift through conflicting feedback, is the role of the formal review process. Ideally, the formal review summarizes and reinforces feedback received throughout the year. If there are surprises in the formal review, then there is a problem with the feedback process.

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    True. However in my experience most employers gave semi regular reviews as their only form of feedback and tied them too closely to the raise you might or might not get. I don't want to imply that reviews are a bad thing. My bad if I'm doing that. It's more that for me personally they were never helpful and pretty much all the places I worked handled the review process poorly.

    My point is really the frequent feedback is important. If reviews are given they should be as you describe, as a summary that reinforces the more frequent feedback and no in lieu of more frequent feedback.
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  7. #37

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    When I had a real job, my situation wasn't the norm. I was a field salesman living in Florida working for a California company. My boss was in California. I was lucky to work for some very good sales managers. The good ones would come out and travel with you for a week frequently and want to visit your important clients. This gave them the opportunity to improve you sales skills, tell you where you stand etc. Reviews were completely a non event. Also, while you did get a raise in reviews, it wasn't a big issue as you made the most money through good sales.

    While thats not possible or practical for most workers, it is a good way to manage employees and deal with review types of issues.

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    i dont give formal reviews to my employees.... ....rather lots of feedback and hopefully lots of praise....i like to think we all have the same goals....they dont sit around and talk, email or text at all and they get lots of compliments from the customers......im pretty happy with our way....
    ..i think it would take a lot of skill to do a real review right...i wouldnt want to try it.. ..we all have negatives...
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    rather lots of feedback and hopefully lots of praise
    That's what I think works best. I think it's ok to let people know what aren't doing well along with what they are doing well and I think it's important to let them know more often than once or twice a year. Now if you do that and also want to have a formal review then I think the review is fine. It simply can't substitute for the more consistent feedback throughout the year.
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  10. #40

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    As a reviewee I usually got positive feedback and for my personality that just motivated me to work harder. I was always given something to work on and I always made it a point to improve in those areas but generally the feedback I received was that it's not an area of concern, just something I could do better at. Depending on where I worked I would have one or two formal reviews a year but I like the idea of quarterly reviews.

    I'm currently the manager of an App Dev team for an Internet Retailer so the tables are switched and I'm the reviewer. There is certainly some stress involved when I have to discuss problem areas. Many times the employee already knows about the problem and take makes it a lot easier but it's still not fun. What is really tough is when we go through multiple reviews and the same problem exists and there really isn't any progress.

    At one large company they replaced standard employee reviews with blind peer reviews. There was still a discussion with the manager to review things that would bubble up from enough other employees but it was really rewarding when those things were positive. It really seemed to bring the team closer together and work with each others strengths better.

    From my perspective as a manager the overall process is stressful and time consuming so it's hard to keep scheduling them but the more we have them the better the team seems to function. I guess that's why they call it work. :-)
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