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Thread: Advice for Writing My Copy

  1. #11
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    Hi Kaloeb,

    I've actually been doing a lot of research on writing copy myself, as I find its a major gap in my marketing materials. I own a small handmade bath and body business near Buffalo, and I don't have any employees yet, so I'm stuck with all the copywriting. I get a regular e-blast from 2 ladies at The Copy Cure, and I've been able to pick up some pretty useful tips from them. I've also been watching a lot of tutorials by Aaron Wrixon of the Copy Trap. Here's some of the tips I've picked up:

    From the Copy Cure:
    Write it Rude - "Just Do It" "Got Milk?" are a couple examples the Copy Cure uses to drive this one home. If you're working on headlines or slogans, write it rude first. It's concise, straight to the point and memorable.

    Make Copy Scannable (this is a big one!) - Break your copy up into small sections with clear headlines and sub-headlines. Bold text or use bullet points. People don't read text on the web anymore, they scan it as fast as they can, and they only read copy if they are absolutely drawn in. Only about 20% of people who visit your website will make it past the headline (that's from Aaron Wrixon).

    Write like you talk - Write what you want to say without giving it much thought, then go back through and edit. Sometimes the most compelling bits are the most natural, conversational bits.

    Be natural & real - write something that a person would say in conversation or think - She suggests listening in on other peoples conversations to hear the way they talk to each other. One exercise I tried was to browse my competitors websites and stores and jot down the thoughts that came into my head. i.e. "Wow, that packaging is beautiful" "Ugh, I'm not reading all of that." This has proved to be a very helpful exercise.

    Write it as graffiti - This is a lot like the Write it Rude suggestion but with more slang.

    Tell people what they want to hear - Identify the target market and what they are looking for. In your case, if your target market is small businesses, they aren't really looking for a website (that's what you're selling them), they're looking for more customers, and your website building skills are the solution. Try to simplify it and see it from your target's point of view to be the most effective.

    I encourage you to check out The Copy Cure and Aaron Wrixon; they have both helped me out so much! Hope this helps you!


    Savannah R. Griffith
    Owner
    Rare Rustic Crafts
    Rare Rustic Crafts

  2. #12
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    You've gotten a lot of excellent advice here.

    As a professional copywriter, here's my piece: read the classic works of copywriters like Dan Kennedy and copy it out long-hand.

    Rinse and repeat.

    Trust me, this will get you far.
    Sales Letter Specialist and Launch Expert

  3. #13
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    I think the most important thing in copywriting is good quality, because if someone know that you're doing great job, they will tell show it to someone else and promote your work.

  4. #14
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    Lots of solid advice. Here's a formula that will help you write copy that "connects" with your prospect - especially if you are just starting out.

    1. Use a headline to attract the reader's attention. Must give the reader a reason to investigate further. Heavy up on main benefit you deliver.

    2. Display empathy. First few paragraphs should have the reader nodding his/her head. eg. "hmmm...that's exactly how I feel....this person "get's me." You almost want reader thinking that you're a mind reader. How do you know what to write for this part? That's where having a clear understanding of your ideal prospect's problem and how you can solve it come in.

    3. Continue to demonstrate you understand the prospect's problem...

    4. THEN you ride in on the white horse and show how you can solve it. You want to establish some credibility here. Social proof in the form of testimonials is important.

    5. Finish with a strong call-to-action..Unless you're in a direct sales business eg. selling ebooks, lower-priced items, don't try to make an "actual" sale here. Too early. Instead, "sell" them on taking the next step in your selling process. Maybe a free report. A free course. Free consult. In exchange, ask for the reader's email address so you can continue the relationship going forward. Hope that helps.

    G
    Last edited by marketingwriter; 05-16-2016 at 12:36 PM.
    Gerry Black
    www.marketingwriter.ca | 1.905.716.7130
    FREE REPORT: Convert Web Visitors Into Clients and Customers - FAST! Get it here!

  5. #15
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    Hi Kaloeb,

    I agree with all of the great advice you have been given. My recommendation is also a classic book called, "The Adweek Copywriting Handbook," by Joseph Sugarman. It's a great read full of original ideas that resonate with the human spirit.

    Ultimately, what comes through regardless of the format is your intention and reason for writing the copy. Good luck and I wish you much success!

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