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Thread: (Company War) Strong Marketing Campaign

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    Default (Company War) Strong Marketing Campaign

    Hello, I opperate a small juice bar in various farmers markets making fresh raw vegetable juices. I've now been in this business for over 2 years, previous to me there was another vendor who transported sugary pasteurized juice. As the popularity in my juices grew it seems that their sales declined tremendously. in recent weeks this other vendor has contacted State Environmental Health, Agriculture Commission and USDA, in a pity attempt to shut me down. Though I am in no violation with any department, it is dreadful to deal with these departments.

    I seek to launch a aggressive marketing campaign to increase my sales and and leave people in discus about pastured juice vrs raw juice.

    Any advice and ideas to how i can execute this campaign without directly naming them out?

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    First, if the goal is to get back at your competitor in some way, let it go. It won't be worth it in the end.

    As far as a marketing campaign, what kind of discussion do you want people to have? What do you want them saying about raw juice? I assume the main benefit and reason to choose raw juice is the health benefits, but what specific conversation do you want people to have? Most people already know that raw vegetable juice is healthier than sugary juices and probably won't be interested in having a conversation about it.

    You say your juices are popular? Why? What do people tell you about why they chose your juice? Do you ask them? The reasons your customers choose your juice could be good topics for conversation.
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    You might also see if there's an attorney in your area familiar with those agencies who can be available in case the agencies contact you. Sometimes having a calm advocate they recognize (usually from the attorney's efforts on someone else's behalf) helps get past any hurdles.
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    I have to agree with vangogh and freelancier. Take the high road. He can turn you in to the USDA and others but once he has done that he has shot his wad. He can't keep turning you in and will run out of places to turn you in.

    I can't say I have had competitors that turned me in to government agencies but I have occasionally had to deal with bad competitors who would lie, bash my product which like yours, was really better than theirs and do everything they could to damage my business. I always believed in being honest with people and not knocking the competition. There is one funny thing about those who I had to deal with who were nasty and unethical. That is that they are out of business now and my business is doing great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turboguy View Post
    I can't say I have had competitors that turned me in to government agencies but I have occasionally had to deal with bad competitors who would lie, bash my product which like yours, was really better than theirs and do everything they could to damage my business. I always believed in being honest with people and not knocking the competition. There is one funny thing about those who I had to deal with who were nasty and unethical. That is that they are out of business now and my business is doing great.
    I know of companies that have been turned in to government agencies because a competitor filed a complaint. I even remember when a member of a government inspection agency "leaked" to the press the results of a bogus water test. This is a royal PITA, even if the "reported" party is 100% compliant as inspectors are trained to find something wrong.

    I fully agree with the 2nd half of the statement. There are some long standing companies that will do everything they can to limit the customers you get through underhanded methods. I've run into this as well. I actually had one come to my shop to fix a job they didn't do right (I didn't have the equipment though I did point out what was done wrong) and he called me everything from stupid to, and I quote, "wasting HIS f'n money and HIS f'n time". It's been two years and I still haven't figured out what he was referring to.

    Keep doing what you are doing. Stay above board and remain ethical in what you do. Underhanded methods will usually come back and haunt people for years.
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    In the short haul people may find some success using dirty tricks, trying to make sales and profits by lying, taking advantage of people and being greedy and unethical but in the long run those who try to provide a quality product or service, to treat customers fairly and standing behind their work will be the ones that survive long term.

    I mentioned the unethical competitor we used to have. It made me think about one thing that happened several years ago. I had someone call me and say he had bought one of my competitors machines on eBay and he asked if I could tell him how to run it. I spent about 15 minutes on the phone going over the operation as best I could and all the time was wondering why they called me instead of them. At the end of the call he told me he had called them. They said since he bought the machine on eBay he should call eBay and ask them to tell him how to run it. That is not what I would call good customer service and I doubt that the customer would buy their machine again. If you care about people and do the best you can sales and profits will take care of themselves. (well for the most part)

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