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Thread: Hiring and Managing Remote Employees

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    Working by the hour requires a higher trust factor. It may also require that you fill out more paperwork to track you (which I don't want you doing because I'm paying you for the time to fill out that paperwork). In reality my only way to manage you as a remote employee is by the project. I know about how many hours a project will take. If you invoice me by the hour it really doesn't matter as the bottom line makes sense. And since you do programming, sometimes that takes longer or shorter times than anticipated, or I may have no clue how long a task will take.

    For most of my working for someone else career I was a remote employee, living in a different state or country. I've had people make me fill out trip reports. Even had a boss that was new and wanted me to call on people that were non prospects. He was new and didn't know our industry. I actually flew to Tennessee once, called the prospect on the phone and never left the hotel just so I could fill out my report. He was eventually fired.

    Bottom line, I don't see how you can manage a remote employee by the hour. You may charge me by the hour, but it's not relevant to me.
    I wanted to clarify my previous post. The project proposal quote is based on hours required for work completion, but the final pay is per the initial quote, unless both parties agree that the quote needs to be adjusted with a changed scope.
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    Bottom line, I don't see how you can manage a remote employee by the hour. You may charge me by the hour, but it's not relevant to me.
    I work pretty much 100% of the time as a remote service provider and frequently work on projects by the hour either directly or as a subcontractor. It's not that hard. For me, I have certain requirements and I get something up front. I also offer hours in set packages that are paid up front and the tasks and time are tracked.

    Every now and then I'll get called by someone who wants to just do hour by hour, but doesn't want to pay anything, not even a deposit, until the work is done. This is a losing situation for a service provider and you will almost always get screwed on this deal. They are actually setting you up to screw you over because they know only a noob would fall for this. Which is why most of us send people like that on their way to find someone else.

    If it's a trusted client, you can set any payment structure that you want. Usually if people have paid you at least once before without any hassle, it's a good sign that you can lower the force field and give the benefit of the doubt. I still don't go to far into the hole without getting at least something. For me that's about 2 hours.
    Last edited by Harold Mansfield; 02-12-2015 at 11:56 AM.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    Every now and then I'll get called by someone who wants to just do hour by hour, but doesn't want to pay anything, not even a deposit, until the work is done. This is a losing situation for a service provider and you will almost always get screwed on this deal. They are actually setting you up to screw you over because they know only a noob would fall for this.
    That's why I apply discounts for pre-payment. For the ones who still want to go full rate and decide not to pay, that's why we have lawyers, courts, and collections.
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  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Altenhofel View Post
    4, sometimes 5 of continuous night sleep, then a half-hour siesta early afternoon. My body works pretty naturally on that form of polyphasic sleep. Sometimes I'll do 2.5 or 3 hours of sleep at night and then take a long 90-minute afternoon siesta.

    24 hours up and 6 hours down works extremely well for me, but that doesn't work so well when one must also interact with society.
    That's too funny. Try working with a client in Thailand now that was no sleep... lol

  5. #25
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    My entire team is remote and has been for years. They are in the Philippines and India.

    When I am hiring remote workers, I look for ones that already have some kind of track record and a good portfolio. No experience, no consideration for the position.

    I also want to see that they have followed instructions in their application. On the sites I use, many of the applicants I get use a generic application and cover letter then go to town applying to everything. To weed out these applicants I will put a small challenge at the end of the job description, something like this: "Reply with the word DINOSAUR as the first word in your application". If they don't do this, I throw out the application.

    All new hires get a 1 week trial project so I can judge their performance. If they are not a good fit, then its not a big deal, we just part ways.

    One thing that has been really helpful with my long-term team members is implementing Scrum. Scrum is a project management framework that helps them to self organize and keeps things flexible when the project or client needs change.

  6. #26

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    I've seen that done a number of times, checkmate. Really good measure to weed out the not so good ones from the good employees.

    Do you pay some of them for the trial projects that you have them do?

  7. #27
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    Great topic and I have to just remind myself that I actually did try using time doctor's tracking software like you suggested in this post and my site was having a minor glitch with the template being out of order so I have to now get an expert site developer to fix it. I heard it was good so once this is fixed i'll keep you updated on the results. Thanks.

  8. #28

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    I have worked remote for almost 20 years and never had a problem. Even worked with clients in Thailand. I would say yes to hiring remote, just make sure and research their past projects.

  9. #29

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    Hello!
    You also can hire freelancers on freelancers websites like guru.com. Websites protects deals and you can choose person or team for any project.

    For example I work on three websites for freelancers. And as freelancer I can tell you what it is a good approach!
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  10. #30

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    I work for a small business that is 100% remote and I have to say I LOVE it. Remote work can be incredibly isolating and hard to manage if you don't focus on the two key factors: communication and team building. It's important to create and maintain a strong company culture even if a remote work environment and it's really not as hard as it sounds.
    Last edited by Harold Mansfield; 03-01-2019 at 03:22 PM. Reason: Link drop removed

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