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Thread: How do companies gain a solid reputation - subconscious advertising?

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    Default How do companies gain a solid reputation - subconscious advertising?

    1. most huge retail companies have a solid reputation but what does it take to get such a big following in terms of the psychological aspect in where the demographic sees your company to have more "value" whether in the goods or more importantly the culture. How do they cultivate this culture and get it to thrive. Its very hard to pinpoint.. but I am influenced by certain brands like nike, levis, apple and they all give out a different vibe that is secure, trendy and state of the art.

    2. Is it years of business? press? brand awareness? How much research do companies put into it - I remember a study done on smells for consumer behaviour, are there anything in this type of category that all brands do to get that edge?

    3.It feels like its nearly 100 percent psychological and subconscious. If anything Id like a view point on this - how does one subconsciously give out these values and culture to differentiate in a market where so many people sell similar items.

    4.How can the little guy compete if they plan to get marketshare and compete with the leaders and the near competitors (to get in the small niche market)? what are some immediate ways and small tweaks or changes that can get the ball rolling.

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    You know there are books written about how to create and sustain a brand, right? There's a reason it requires a book to explain it. There are so many details involved and so many different paths to getting there.

    How can the little guy compete if they plan to get market share and compete with the leaders and the near competitors (to get in the small niche market)?
    Little guys -- SMART little guys -- don't start out competing with the big dogs unless the little guy isn't so little and has deep pockets.

    Little guys start out by defining a niche that's being underserved or ignored by the big dogs, charging a premium their products in that niche market (which they can get because there's little competition in that market), getting a reputation by customers who need exactly what's being offered, and then expanding beyond that niche once they get some deep pockets to fund that expansion.

    Think about the market when Home Depot got started: a bunch of mom-and-pop lumberyards, small-town hardware stores, Ace hardware, that's about it. All of those provided a limited set of products, but wonderful customer service. So they invented their niche: a HUGE retail store with everything you could want but limited service. That's their basic brand (ignoring the orange color of their logo, which is a separate topic). Once they proved that the concept was profitable, they went out and got a ton of money from venture capitalists so they could expand at a tremendous rate. Now they define the market and the smaller stores are considered "niche". But it took a ton of money to get there. And their basic brand hasn't really changed.
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    Read about Nordstrom's customer service... We have always tried to model them. Mainly the idea is not to f#^& up. Execute perfectly and when you have problems, work with the customer to resolve them to their satisfaction. Once you do that make sure the problem will never happen again if possible.

    We tend to believe our customers... even when the situation is not believable. I had one customer that we sent tracked and the post office delivered to her door, customer did not receive. Sent a second shipment, never arrived. Finally worked with the customer and sent Fedex and it got there. They had some problems with mail delivery. One of the packages came back.

    You would think it would be expensive to do business like this but we get a lot of referrals and the problems are few and far between.
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    Thank you both.

    Shrinkme - I had issues on the customer side of things and its frustrating when customer service don't believe you from the second you speak. Its good that you do things right

    freelancier - The information tends to sink in more if I get some different opinions and view points first and then jump into some books or take a course. I will look into a few books. Are there any must reads that you can recommend on this subject or marketing in general?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Freelancier View Post
    You know there are books written about how to create and sustain a brand, right? There's a reason it requires a book to explain it. There are so many details involved and so many different paths to getting there.

    Little guys -- SMART little guys -- don't start out competing with the big dogs.....

    Little guys start out by defining a niche that's being underserved or ignored by the big dogs.

    .
    Absolutely!

    Don't even try to compete with branding on their level and don't get too wrapped up in the psychology of branding. Branding is useless if your product or service doesn't hold up. Focus first on local or niche reputation.

    The best weapon a small company has compared to a big company is being nimble and repsonsive, not only to customers but to market and industry trends. You can beat them at that game sometimes. Big companies can become lethargic and slow moving while liitle guys can move quick.

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    Are there any must reads that you can recommend on this subject or marketing in general?
    One of the few books I kept from my MBA was Strategic Market Management by David Aaker (the newer editions are ridiculously priced and how much could have changed?). It's not a fun read, but it explains a lot about strategic competitive advantage, how to differentiate yourself, and how brand equity works, so it'll hit most of your hot-button issues for this topic. SCA and differentiation are huge for helping you determine how to create a brand that supports what you're doing.
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    Thanks il take a look.

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    I actually read an article today by Peter Shankman that touches on some of these topics. You definitely need to read more than just this article - I'd check into some of Shankman's books, in addition to the other book that Freelancier mentioned. I've been reading Shankman's blog posts lately and he's got a lot of good stuff to say. Here's the article
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl View Post
    2. Is it years of business? press? brand awareness?
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl View Post
    How much research do companies put into it - I remember a study done on smells for consumer behaviour, are there anything in this type of category that all brands do to get that edge?
    The put a LOT of research into it. But it's not trickery and "subliminal" advertising. It's putting out a good product, having good customer service, years and years of marketing and brand building. Plain and simple, they put the work in to be a trusted brand and back it up in their products and services.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl View Post
    3.It feels like its nearly 100 percent psychological and subconscious. If anything Id like a view point on this - how does one subconsciously give out these values and culture to differentiate in a market where so many people sell similar items.
    There are many things that we subconsciously have specific reactions to, but successful companies aren't tricking you into liking them. What they are doing is called marketing. But marketing only goes so far if the product or service sucks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidl View Post
    4.How can the little guy compete if they plan to get marketshare and compete with the leaders and the near competitors (to get in the small niche market)? what are some immediate ways and small tweaks or changes that can get the ball rolling.
    If you are trying to capitalize in a small niche market you aren't competing with the big brands so why would you waste money trying instead of building the niche that you are talking about? Everyone is not your competition just because they may happen to do the same or a similar thing as you do.

  10. #10

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    thanks harold. number 4 didn't make any sense once i read it back again. What about if I was a brand new company (non niche market) why would consumers pick me over the guy that already has good reputation being in business for several years if they offer similar services (random hypothetical example: Nike opens up in 1980s and in 2005 adidas opened up shop and has not as good a selection, not as much capital, lower status. How would adidas gain its reputation like it has now when there are other competitors that dominate the market and B. what would adidas have to do different now that they are the little guys. Would the adidas we see today be different if adidas opened in 2005?


    Im trying to get a bit into the psychology of why people gravitate towards a brand. It seems like a number of factors come into play but it varies from person to person. I guess what I'm trying to do is get down to the core of human behaviour of consumers and from there I can get a better understanding of how to affectively market something.

    Im starting to understand the concept a little more now that I thought about it for longer. Companies will try to follow a certain type of "style" for lack of a better word and from there everything that they do is to try to create that certain style in their advertising, website, packaging, product and whole presentation. Like for example a luxury bag, will have packaging thats sleek, a product thats finely crafted, website that well made, logo/ stylistic identity that is recognizable and lastly advertising that conveys being in a group/clique that gives emotional value which is where most of the advertising is going to be based (nike-> inspiration, health, strength and courage Rolls royce-> luxury, travel, comfort, timelessness)

    The last step is a byproduct of the marketing which would be how the brand is interpreted by the consumer and feedback is taken.

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