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Thread: Writing methods

  1. #11
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    vangogh's Avatar

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    Same here. It's all an iterative process to me that you keep working at over and over. You seek perfection, but you can never attain it. All you can do is take what you have and try to make it better. Sometimes that includes realizing you went down the wrong path and starting over again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vangogh View Post
    @Dan - the no draft approach is interesting. I like to call my first attempt a draft since it takes all the pressure off having to come up with something. By calling it something other than a finished piece the words will come out quickly. Ultimately I see everything I write or design or program like a piece of clay that can be molded over and over again. The first draft to me is like grabbing the clay in the first place so there's something there to mold. Sometimes when I grab the clay it's practically molded itself. Other times it needs more work before it becomes the shape I want.
    well, some things take longer than others, and sometimes I do go back and rewrite, etc. What I'm saying is I never give a customer a "draft" - the first thing I send them is what I call the finished work. I also send a "read me first" document that explains a few things, and one of the things it explains is I will happily do a revision if you really feel I missed the mark.

    What this does is it puts the ball in their court to really, and not arbitrarily, find something wrong.

    I started doing this when I noticed that most people really couldn't tell me definitively what they wanted changed, just that it was a draft, so they expected the final to be "different". Once I stopped calling it a draft, that went away.

    I'm also really thorough in the beginning - I made a fairly detailed questionnaire that asks good questions, makes people think about their business, etc. If we have to, we'll talk about it too. And I don't start a project unless I am very clear where I am going. It works well.

    Basically, what this approach has done is lessen the rewriting that doesn't need to be done. About 80% of my clients are thrilled with the first work I give them. The other 20% have excellent comments (because I kind of forced them to really dig), which results in a better product for them.
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  3. #13
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    Oh got'cha. Yeah I wouldn't send a client a rough draft of writing either. Generally I'm not doing writing for them. Most of what I described is the writing for my own site.

    For me if I don't call it a draft then I spend too much time editing what I've written instead of writing the next line. By calling it a draft I keep the editor away a little bit. By saying it's a draft I know I'm going to edit later so I can just get on with the writing.
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