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Thread: Can a foreigner register a Sole Proprietorship in the USA (FL) ?

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    Default Can a foreigner register a Sole Proprietorship in the USA (FL) ?

    Can a foreigner, (so someone who does not have US citizenship neither a green card), can register a Sole Proprietorship? Is a work visa enough ?

    Anyone can register an LLC or another company, but I wonder if the particular character of the Sole Proprietorships does not require US citizenship ?
    Which organization could inform me ?
    If here in this forum a foreigner tells me he has already opened a US Sole Proprietorship (in particular in Florida), the question will be closed !
    Last edited by French from 974; 02-24-2018 at 07:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by French from 974 View Post
    Can a foreigner, (so someone who does not have US citizenship neither a green card), can register a Sole Proprietorship? Is a work visa enough ?

    Anyone can register an LLC or another company, but I wonder if the particular character of the Sole Proprietorships does not require US citizenship ?
    Which organization could inform me ?
    If here in this forum a foreigner tells me he has already opened a US Sole Proprietorship (in particular in Florida), the question will be closed !
    A sole proprietorship isn't really an entity, it doesn't have to be registered in the state. If you start a lemonade state, it is automatically a sole proprietorship. If you bring on a friend to help you with the lemonade stand, the business is automatically considered a partnership. You remain that way until the company is registered.

    To answer your question, as long as the company is operated and not registered in the US then it's considered a sole proprietorship. You do not have to be a resident. However, there are no legal protections when you're not registered, so pray you don't get sued.

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    You may have to file for a fictitious name if you are using anything except your own name. In other words if you operate as French's Marketing and Consulting that or something where it isn't your name you would likely need to register that and then it would technically be Pierre French DBA French's Marketing and Consulting. If you just operate as Pierre French then it isn't required. Of course that assumes your name is Pierre French which I just pulled out of the air as an example.
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    In order to legally operate a business in the United States, every business is required to have a tax number. Generally, a sole proprietor (who is a U.S. citizen) can use their own personal social security number as their business' tax number. However, for a non-U.S. citizen, who does not have a social security number, should obtain an individual tax identification number (ITIN).
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    Depending on the nature of the business, you may need State and/or local licenses or permits. In my limited experience, state government websites seem to be pretty good about providing guidance to prospective businesses about what they need to do to get started doing business in that state.

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