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Thread: Legally liable?

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    Default Legally liable?

    I have a product that is rated to handle a max of 6200 lbs. I have a customer who wishes to use 9000 lbs with this product. If I have him sign off that he understands what he is getting into am I still liable?

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    I would think not, but with the crazy legal system in NA who knows. I do know that if I run an aluminum oxide grinding wheel faster than the RPM on the label, and it comes apart, the liability is on me.
    Brad Miedema
    Fulcrum Saw & Tool

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    I would tell him point blank that it's not rated for that weight. Period. Leave it at that. If he still wants to buy it, it's on him. Don't make him sign anything that proves you knew what he was using it for and "let" him do it anyway.
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    I am with Harold on this, although I would keep documentation of the fact that you did inform the customer of the rating for the product, and be prepared to show that the product is clearly marked with its rating, and is supplied with documentation that also clearly spells out what the rating is for the product. In general, the less you know about what a customer ultimately does (outside the scope of the product's intended use) with any products you sell, the better (as long as the intended use and limitations are demonstrably clear).

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    Thanks for the replies. I didn't need the sale, and the last thing I need is more problems, so I passed on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobjob View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I didn't need the sale, and the last thing I need is more problems, so I passed on it.
    Glad that you dropped it, even if your legally "good" just pass up such sales. It will not only probably save your wallet but also save you on drama...

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