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Thread: 48% of all CMS websites are WordPress, and other stats

  1. #11
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    @ Harold. Why and how do you think WP took over the market?

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    hello world Array Harold Mansfield's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    @ Harold. Why and how do you think WP took over the market?
    Because the others dropped the ball.

    You could use on your own hosting and was open source. And they did a good job at documentation, and support articles.

    All the other emerging CMS and Blog platforms at the time were proprietary and hosted. There was little style customization, bad support, and it was hard to implement or add any functionality because they blocked you from adding any code other than HTML and CSS.

    Google, Yahoo and Microsoft were trying to build blogging communities within their own ecosystem, which really kind of backfired when they started becoming spam havens that they couldn't police effectively.

    WordPress let you take it were ever you wanted (no subdomains), and do to it whatever you had the talent to do. AND they stayed on top of the updates. Constant improvements. They never let up and still don't.

    Of the other CMS's where you could self host, they were and still continue to be ridiculously difficult to administer for the average person so for designers it made it hard to sell them as realistic solutions to small businesses in an era where more and more people want to do as much as they can in house.

    WordPress was and still continues to be an easy sell to business owners who like the fact that there's an admin panel to log into to control their website. Even if they never learn to use it, the fact that it's there is a big deal for people who've had websites since the beginning and are used to paying someone $500 just to change a sentence on a page because it was all buried in code.

    It also seemed like no one could see the potential of a CMS outside of blogs, or the potential of blogs as an integrated part of a business website and online marketing. And it seemed like Google actually leaned into that curve even though they didn't implement it themselves with blogger.

    WordPress made the attempt to make it easily accessible, they nurtured their community of developers, they focused on it having a user friendly admin panel ( not perfect, but learnable), but it was the plug in developers..specifically the ones that started making SEO tools and enhancements.. that made it really take off.

    And then the magical explosion of social media was the icing on the cake. People were consuming information at a record pace..literally by the minute. Having the ability to post articles and information from your website became a necessity. By then WordPress was already growing share and it was too late for the others to catch up. They were too far behind and no one wanted to have their website one place and blog on another.

    Basically they just made the all the right moves when everyone else was stumbling because they wanted to retain all of the control and could only think one way at the time. They made it easier for the average joe to get online with something of quality, and that was customizable and scalable to be used for more than just blogs, and then social media link sharing put the icing on the cake. That's how they got the market share.

    Is WordPress the best for every situation? Of course not. But it doesn't matter what is technically the "best" is if people can't use it. And that's where so many other CMS's (apps and software too) drop the ball.

    This is all just my opinion of course.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    Because the others dropped the ball.

    You could use on your own hosting and was open source. And they did a good job at documentation, and support articles.

    All the other emerging CMS and Blog platforms at the time were proprietary and hosted. There was little style customization, bad support, and it was hard to implement or add any functionality because they blocked you from adding any code other than HTML and CSS.

    Google, Yahoo and Microsoft were trying to build blogging communities within their own ecosystem, which really kind of backfired when they started becoming spam havens that they couldn't police effectively.

    WordPress let you take it were ever you wanted (no subdomains), and do to it whatever you had the talent to do. AND they stayed on top of the updates. Constant improvements. They never let up and still don't.

    Of the other CMS's where you could self host, they were and still continue to be ridiculously difficult to administer for the average person so for designers it made it hard to sell them as realistic solutions to small businesses in an era where more and more people want to do as much as they can in house.

    WordPress was and still continues to be an easy sell to business owners who like the fact that there's an admin panel to log into to control their website. Even if they never learn to use it, the fact that it's there is a big deal for people who've had websites since the beginning and are used to paying someone $500 just to change a sentence on a page because it was all buried in code.

    It also seemed like no one could see the potential of a CMS outside of blogs, or the potential of blogs as an integrated part of a business website and online marketing. And it seemed like Google actually leaned into that curve even though they didn't implement it themselves with blogger.

    WordPress made the attempt to make it easily accessible, they nurtured their community of developers, they focused on it having a user friendly admin panel ( not perfect, but learnable), but it was the plug in developers..specifically the ones that started making SEO tools and enhancements.. that made it really take off.

    Basically they just made the all the right moves when everyone else was stumbling because they wanted to retain all of the control and could only think one way at the time. They made it easier for the average joe to get online with something of quality, and that was scalable. That's how they got the market share.

    Is WordPress the best for every situation? Of course not. But it doesn't matter what is technically the "best" is if people can't use it. And that's where so many other CMS's (apps and software too) drop the ball.

    This is all just my opinion of course.
    Wordpress is capable of pretty much ANYTHING if you have the talent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Owen View Post
    Wordpress is capable of pretty much ANYTHING if you have the talent.
    I think that is an overstretch. It is a good program that many lay people can figure out and use. Beyond that there are many developers / designers that know it.

    What you are suggesting is that a Ferrari is good for off road mud truck driving with the proper knowledge. That is BS and you know it.

    There are a lot of good CMS's out there. There are a lot of good custom websites. It depends on what your requirements are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by billbenson View Post
    I think that is an overstretch. It is a good program that many lay people can figure out and use. Beyond that there are many developers / designers that know it.

    What you are suggesting is that a Ferrari is good for off road mud truck driving with the proper knowledge. That is BS and you know it.

    There are a lot of good CMS's out there. There are a lot of good custom websites. It depends on what your requirements are.
    Name something that isn't possible with Wordpress (that of course isn't back end like a custom control panel such as cPanel) but something front end. Chances are someone with PHP knowledge can do it with Wordpress.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Owen View Post
    Name something that isn't possible with Wordpress (that of course isn't back end like a custom control panel such as cPanel) but something front end. Chances are someone with PHP knowledge can do it with Wordpress.
    cPanel is a front end.

    Wordpress APIs make it very difficult to build reasonably complex things. Can it be done? Sure. But once you start getting into reasonably complex applications, you begin fighting the APIs. When you're having to fight APIs, that's a sure sign it is not anywhere close to the right tool for the job. It also doesn't help that the APIs are built around PHP4 philosophy and also encourage bad practices (such as placing business logic in the presentation layer or making developers responsible for sanitizing output from Wordpress APIs that should have been sanitized by default). Building things like forums and e-commerce (all but the most basic use cases) generates much more developer overhead than necessary.
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    What do you mean by "reasonably complex things". Can you give an example?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    What do you mean by "reasonably complex things". Can you give an example?
    I gave two previously.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Altenhofel View Post
    Building things like forums and e-commerce (all but the most basic use cases) generates much more developer overhead than necessary.
    ERP systems, resource booking (event tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars, conferences, etc.), infrastructure front end, help desk...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Altenhofel View Post
    ERP systems, resource booking (event tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars, conferences, etc.), infrastructure front end, help desk...
    People run these things on WordPress. There are many premium add ons that are ready out of the box, or custom functions can be easily created.
    Integration with mobile apps, QR codes, bar codes, NFC check ins. It's all doable and not really that complex.

    Also, every thing doesn't have to be integrated into the WordPress architecture just because the site's foundation is WordPress. You can add pages with any functionality on them that you want, connected to any 3rd party database that lets you.

    Pretty much any CRM, Concierge, and Booking software can be integrated into a WordPress site. Companies are aware that it's heavily used and make WordPress tools and integration scripts and API's readily available. Pretty much expected at this point.

    WordPress is only limited by the person using it. If you can build it, you can build it. Doesn't matter if you're using HTML, Joomla, WordPress, Bootstrap, or anything else.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Mansfield View Post
    People run these things on WordPress.
    I never said they don't. I said the developer overhead (and therefore the accumulating technical debt) is much more than it should be, largely due to a PHP4 architecture (that will likely not be improved to a modern architecture until the powers that be see that backwards compatibility should not be a first class citizen).
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