Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Editing Existing Website

  1. #1
    Member Array
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    2
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Editing Existing Website

    Hello,

    I need urgent help. I started working for a company with an existing website created by the previous designer. I had no contact with this designer or whatsoever and haven't got a chance to meet him. I have a problem with our website. It's too complicated for me to edit the website. I'm editing it manually with it's codes. Is there like a faster way to edit this because I need to change infos from time to time. The only info I got from the previous designer are the login from the filezilla where I am able to download the files that were upload online from our website. Is there like a way where I can edit it like wordpress style. I'm pretty sure he used like a program or something to create this.I know it's not the most organized website ever I don't know how the previous designer managed to be as confusing as this. I Hope you can help me.

    Thank You

  2. #2
    Post Impressionist Array vangogh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Boulder, Colorado
    Posts
    14,986
    Likes (Given)
    250
    Likes (Received)
    509

    Default

    Welcome to the forum John. I removed the link you provided because I don't want to send people to a random link to download a zip file. The code you pasted here wasn't complete and to be honest, none of us are going to wade through all the code of your site, so I removed that too. It's not like we could help even if we wanted to as you didn't tell us what needs to be edited and you didn't provide enough code anyway. From what I saw your code was a mix of HTML, CSS, and Javascript from the head of an HTML document. You either understand HTML, CSS, and Javascript enough to edit the site or you don't.

    Websites don't automatically come with administrative sides like WordPress. If the site wasn't built using a content management system (CMS) then you have to edit the code directly. Editing the files directly is usually the fastest way to edit the site, but you do have to understand the code first. If the site was built using a CMS then get the login information and login to the administrative side of the site, but if it wasn't then you either need to learn how to work with the code or tell your boss you don't know how and someone else needs to work on the site.
    l Join me as I share my creative process and journey as a writer | StevenBradley.me
    l Design, Development, Marketing, and SEO Tutorials | Steven Bradley's Notebook
    l Get my book about Design Fundamentals

  3. #3
    Member Needs New Keyboard Array
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Beaver Falls, PA
    Posts
    764
    Likes (Given)
    17
    Likes (Received)
    93

    Default

    If your website is not responsive you might want to think about having it redone in Wordpress or some other CMS program and that would make it easy to edit. It is pretty important these days to have a responsive web site (says someone who still has some sites that are not). There could be a chance it was created in Dreamweaver which was very popular back a ways and if that was the case you could get a copy of Dreamweaver to edit it and that is pretty much WYSIWYG or at least easier than what you are doing.
    Ray Badger, Turbo Technologies, Inc.
    www.TurboTurf.com www.IceControlSprayers.com

  4. #4
    root Array Harold Mansfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    9,445
    Likes (Given)
    1027
    Likes (Received)
    955

    Default

    I agree with what was already said. Either you know HTML and CSS or you don't. Unfortunately there is no easy button or conversion magic that will give you an easy to use admin panel if it wasn't built on a CMS with an admin panel.

    It's common for older sites to be all code. No CMS.

    Also be careful with Filezilla. In my experience it can skip files that are inside folders. Make sure you back up everything you do with it.

    If you're editing files bare bones with notepad, maybe use Notepad++ so that you can at least see line numbers and keep the structure of the files. https://notepad-plus-plus.org/

  5. #5
    Refugee from the .com Array cbscreative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    2,877
    Likes (Given)
    47
    Likes (Received)
    88

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by turboguy View Post
    There could be a chance it was created in Dreamweaver which was very popular back a ways
    Hey, I still use DW as much as I can and prefer it over WordPress by far. But I also use the code pane and the only thing I use the design pane for is to quickly get to a spot on the page I need to work on.

    If the site was created in DW, you may very well have a template file(s) in your source files which are typically in the Templates folder and have a .dwt extension. One way to tell is to look for a .dwt reference at the top of the HTML code for the site pages. If you don't see that in the page code, then this point doesn't apply. If it does have it, you can make site wide changes to something such as a navigation bar in a matter of seconds.

    If it's WP, Joomla, or another CMS, you'll need access to the back end as already mentioned.
    Steve Chittenden

    Web design, graphic design, professional writing, and marketing.

    "Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat." -- Theodore Roosevelt

  6. #6
    Member Array
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    2
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Hello Guys,

    Well Im using dreamweaver to edit the website's codes. I have no idea with Java script or whatsoever. But with HTML I can understand a little. but the thing is okay I can edit some minor details about the website, but when i'm adding new things I had to change it from what it is because I have no idea how it was created. For example, with one photo uploaded on my website it has this id number #u6081 which defines it's position, characteristics everything and if I want to add one new photo I have to create another id for it. I tried making my own id with different format from what they have done with the rest for example #photo1 but it still works as long as I have # at the beginning. Anyway I'm just really confused because why does every single line of the text, every photo, every details on the website uses a unique id from each other. Is this how css really works? This is so confusing I know.

    Thanks for the replies. Kind regards to everyone

  7. #7
    Refugee from the .com Array cbscreative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    2,877
    Likes (Given)
    47
    Likes (Received)
    88

    Default

    Sounds like a disaster to me. Using an id on an image makes sense if it's a logo in the top corner but the rest should be a class. What you could do is copy the id attributes in the CSS and add them as a class.

    It also sounds like you need to learn HTML and CSS. Investing in some training will alleviate a lot of pain.
    Steve Chittenden

    Web design, graphic design, professional writing, and marketing.

    "Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat." -- Theodore Roosevelt

  8. #8
    Member Array
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    8
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Try some Lynda.com tutorials on html, css and javascript.

    They have great courses.

  9. #9
    Refugee from the .com Array cbscreative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Right here
    Posts
    2,877
    Likes (Given)
    47
    Likes (Received)
    88

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DJNotApplicable View Post
    Try some Lynda.com tutorials on html, css and javascript.

    They have great courses.
    Although I went traditional classroom route (Lynda was not around or as well established back then), this is excellent advice. Lynda has mastered the art of video learning.

    In addition, look for books by Peachpit Press (the HTML and CSS book is excellent). They're inexpensive and well written. The glossaries and color charts in the back are well organized and invaluable. It's the only book I keep on my desk because the quick reference when needed is easy and useful. It's a great accompaniment to DW too. You may have to use the reference for something you don't use often, but the code hints in DW are wonderful. Type a couple characters or so and either select the correct code or just hit Enter if the right one is highlighted.
    Steve Chittenden

    Web design, graphic design, professional writing, and marketing.

    "Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat." -- Theodore Roosevelt

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •